Craig and Nancy Schnuck

Robert S. Brookings Award

Through their exceptional service and generosity, Distinguished Trustee Craig Schnuck and his wife, Nancy, have left an indelible mark on Washington University and its entire community.

Nowhere is this more visible than the east end of the Danforth Campus. In 2017, the couple made a significant gift to name the Craig and Nancy Schnuck Pavilion, an 18,000-square foot facility on the east  end that has become a vital gathering place for students, faculty members, and visitors. The building, which opened in October 2019, houses the popular Parkside Café eatery and serves as headquarters for the university’s sustainability initiatives.

As a longtime member and chair of the Board of Trustees’ Building, Grounds, and Real Estate Committee, Craig was among a handful of university leaders who played a key role in the transformation of the east end. The massive project spanning 18 acres involved five new buildings, including the Schnuck Pavilion; expansion of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum; an underground parking garage; and a park.

Craig was recruited to join the Board of Trustees in 1996. He is one of the board’s most dedicated and longest-serving members. He was board chair from 2014 to 2019 and has held the position of vice chair since then. He also is a past member and chair of the School of Medicine National Council.

Craig and Nancy’s involvement with Washington University extends the Schnuck family’s relationship with the university, which began when Craig’s father, Donald, was a business student. Since then, many family members have earned degrees at WashU. The family has provided financial support for scholarships, Olin Business School, the School of Medicine, and other areas.

Craig is part of the third generation of Schnucks to run Schnuck Markets Inc., one of the largest privately owned supermarket chains in the United States. He has served as president, CEO, and chairman of the company. He currently is chairman emeritus. Active in civic affairs throughout the St. Louis area, Craig is a member of the Barnes-Jewish Hospital board of directors and has held leadership positions with the Greater St. Louis Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America, United Way of Greater St. Louis, and John Burroughs School.

Gerry and Bob Virgil

Robert S. Brookings Award

Gerry and Bob Virgil met in the mid-1950s at Beloit College. Following Bob’s service in the U.S. Army, they were married in Chicago in September 1958 and a week later moved to St. Louis where Bob began pursuing a Master of Business Administration at Washington University. They never left St. Louis or Washington University.

Bob earned his master’s degree in 1960 and a doctorate in business administration in 1967. He began teaching accounting in 1961, served as vice chancellor for student affairs from 1973 to 1975, and was acting dean and then dean of the John M. Olin School of Business from 1977 to 1993. He became a trustee in 2001 and emeritus trustee in 2006.

Bob was visiting professor of accounting at the Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College from 1975 to 1976 and then at the Israel Institute of Technology (Technion) in 1989. 

Of Bob’s many activities at Washington University, most meaningful to him are chairing the Faculty Senate Council from 1972 to 1974; the implementation committee for the first Presidential Debate hosted by the university in 1992; the planning committee for the observance of the university’s sesquicentennial in 2003; and the scholarship initiative for Leading Together, the university’s most recent fundraising campaign. With Trustee Andy Bursky, he co-chaired this year’s Tribute to Chancellor Emeritus Danforth. 

In 1993, Bob joined the financial services firm Edward Jones as general partner with responsibility for management development. He retired as a general partner in 2007. Bob is fond of saying that he has been incredibly fortunate to have had careers with two of America’s outstanding institutions, Washington University and Edward Jones.

From 1983 to 1989, Bob was a director of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis and chaired its board from 1988 to 1989. From 1985 to 1989, he chaired the board of the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management, dedicated to attracting historically underrepresented men and women to the study of business.

In the 1980’s, he co-chaired, with the late Margaret Bush Wilson and the late Leslie Bond, a citizens task force under the auspices of Confluence St. Louis addressing issues of governance in the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District. His other community service activities have involved the Magic House, Girls Inc. of St. Louis, and City Academy.

For years, Gerry was actively engaged as a leader in the family’s church, Glendale Presbyterian Church, and with Meals on Wheels in Kirkwood, Missouri. She was Bob’s indispensable partner when he was dean. She raised their children, held the household together, and was at Bob’s side continuously in his development responsibilities. Her lasagna casserole and seven-layer salad, served at the dinners they hosted for alumni and volunteers in their home, were legendary. “Whatever I did as dean, I could not have done without her.  She was amazing,” Bob frequently has said. Gerry and Bob have four children, Karen Weaver of Jacksonville, Florida; Kim Blake of Glenview, Illinois; Kate Ellen Price of Dallas; and Matthew Robert Virgil of Hudson, Ohio. Gerry and Bob have 12 grandchildren, a great granddaughter, and their lab Maisie.

Yvonne L. Cordell, JD ’88

Partner, Cordell & Cordell

Joseph and Yvonne Cordell are accomplished entrepreneurs in the field of family law. Together, they founded one of the largest family law firms serving men in the world, with more than 100 offices across the United States and the United Kingdom. Cordell & Cordell is committed to championing the interests of men, fathers, and their children. They also developed and own the legal software company, Lexicon, and the estate-planning firm Cordell Planning Partners, now called TuckerAllen.

The idea for Cordell & Cordell came about when Joseph recognized a need to advocate for the unique male perspective as it is affected in the family law courts, allowing his clients to feel comfortable that their point of view is understood and actively represented.  Joseph became a noted expert on the protection of fathers’ rights, publishing three books on the subject. He also created and regularly contributes to the websites DadsDivorce.com and MensRights.com.

In addition to her law practice, Yvonne served on the board of directors for Teen Challenge of St. Louis, now called Adult & Teen Challenge of St. Louis. The organization supports individuals with substance use disorder and other problems. She currently serves on the board of elders of West County Assembly of God, a church in Town and Country, Missouri.

The Cordells have a long history of philanthropy and service to the university. Yvonne served on the WashU Scholarship Initiative Committee, and Joseph has served on the Washington University Law National Council since 2013.

In 2019, the couple established the Joseph and Yvonne Cordell Institute for Policy in Medicine & Law, dedicated to the study of ethical issues surrounding data-driven health care. The School of Law recognized them both with Distinguished Alumni Awards in 2017.

Joseph, who is both an attorney and a certified public accountant, earned his bachelor’s degree in accountancy from Oklahoma State University, his Juris Doctor from the University of Texas, and his Master of Laws from Washington University. Yvonne earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from Illinois State University and then completed her Juris Doctor from Washington University. In 2019, she earned a master’s degree in theological studies from Covenant Theological Seminary.

Joseph and Yvonne have two daughters, Caroline and Elizabeth. Caroline is currently a law clerk for Judge Ray Gruender on the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and Elizabeth is a medical student at Washington University School of Medicine.

Joseph E. Cordell, LLM ’08

Founder and Principal Partner, Cordell & Cordell

Joseph and Yvonne Cordell are accomplished entrepreneurs in the field of family law. Together, they founded one of the largest family law firms serving men in the world, with more than 100 offices across the United States and the United Kingdom. Cordell & Cordell is committed to championing the interests of men, fathers, and their children. They also developed and own the legal software company, Lexicon, and the estate-planning firm Cordell Planning Partners, now called TuckerAllen.

The idea for Cordell & Cordell came about when Joseph recognized a need to advocate for the unique male perspective as it is affected in the family law courts, allowing his clients to feel comfortable that their point of view is understood and actively represented.  Joseph became a noted expert on the protection of fathers’ rights, publishing three books on the subject. He also created and regularly contributes to the websites DadsDivorce.com and MensRights.com.

In addition to her law practice, Yvonne served on the board of directors for Teen Challenge of St. Louis, now called Adult & Teen Challenge of St. Louis. The organization supports individuals with substance use disorder and other problems. She currently serves on the board of elders of West County Assembly of God, a church in Town and Country, Missouri.

The Cordells have a long history of philanthropy and service to the university. Yvonne served on the WashU Scholarship Initiative Committee, and Joseph has served on the Washington University Law National Council since 2013.

In 2019, the couple established the Joseph and Yvonne Cordell Institute for Policy in Medicine & Law, dedicated to the study of ethical issues surrounding data-driven health care. The School of Law recognized them both with Distinguished Alumni Awards in 2017.

Joseph, who is both an attorney and a certified public accountant, earned his bachelor’s degree in accountancy from Oklahoma State University, his Juris Doctor from the University of Texas, and his Master of Laws from Washington University. Yvonne earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from Illinois State University and then completed her Juris Doctor from Washington University. In 2019, she earned a master’s degree in theological studies from Covenant Theological Seminary.

Joseph and Yvonne have two daughters, Caroline and Elizabeth. Caroline is currently a law clerk for Judge Ray Gruender on the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and Elizabeth is a medical student at Washington University School of Medicine.

Ronald G. Evens, AB ’61, MD ’64

Professor Emeritus of Radiology

An exceptionally talented medical administrator, Ronald G. Evens, MD, has served at the forefront of health care in St. Louis.

Evens became director of Washington University’s Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology in 1971 at the age of 31. He later served terms as president and CEO of St. Louis Children’s Hospital, president of Barnes-Jewish Hospital, vice president of the Washington University Medical Center, and interim president of the Goldfarb School of Nursing at Barnes-Jewish College.

In his role at Mallinckrodt, Evens developed the university’s radiology department into one of the best in the world and actively worked to recruit faculty and students from historically underrepresented backgrounds. Under his watch, institute faculty pioneered applications for new imaging technologies such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). An early advocate for using computers in medical care, he also oversaw the installation of large-scale computer systems in the first few years of his tenure, which helped track patients and process information. 

The first in his family to graduate from college, Evens earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from Washington University in 1961. Three years later, he graduated from the School of Medicine. After completing his residency, he obtained a Picker Fellowship from the National Academy of Sciences, which gave him the opportunity to pursue graduate level coursework in business administration and education at the university. In 1972, he was named the Elizabeth E. Mallinckrodt Professor, serving as the first endowed chair in the Department of Radiology. He also served as a professor of medical economics at Olin Business School.

The recipient of three different alumni awards from the School of Medicine, Ron and his wife, Hanna, are loyal supporters of Washington University. Together with many friends, they created the Ronald and Hanna Evens Endowed Chair in Women’s Health at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in 2005. More recently, the couple has made endowed gifts for fellowships and scholarships. Ron and Hanna, a retired nurse, live in Kirkwood, Missouri. They have three children—Ronald Jr. Evens, BSBA ’84, MBA ’86, MHA, ’86; Christine Speidel, AB ’86, MSW, ’88; and Amanda Yahng, AB ’89—as well as seven grandchildren.

Stephen H. Lockhart, AB ’77

Chief Medical Officer (retired), Sutter Health

As a physician executive at one of the largest nonprofit health systems in the United States, Stephen Lockhart, MD, dedicated himself to ensuring quality and equitable health care for more than 3 million Americans.

Lockhart joined California-based Sutter Health in 2003 as medical director of surgical services for California Pacific Medical Center. He later took on several executive positions, eventually becoming the organization’s senior vice president and chief medical officer.

His passion for improving health-care equity inspired him to design and implement a Health Equity Index, which tracks outcomes among different patient populations. Several other provider organizations in California have since adopted the tool. In 2017, former California Gov. Jerry Brown appointed Lockhart to his Advisory Committee on Precision Medicine, focused on the use of advanced computing and technology to better combat disease.

More recently, Lockhart played a key role in Sutter’s efforts to care for patients with COVID-19, coordinating with state and county agencies to manage bed capacity and conducting statistical analyses to help meet patients’ needs. He also supervised nationally recognized research projects addressing health disparities and the pandemic.

A Rhodes scholar, Lockhart earned his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Washington University and a master’s degree in economics from Oxford University in England. He completed his medical degree and doctorate in biostatistics from Cornell University. His many honors include being named one of Modern Healthcare’s “Top 25 Minority Executives in Health Care” in 2018 and one of the country’s top chief medical officers by Becker’s Hospital Review in 2020. In addition, Arts & Sciences recognized him with a Distinguished Alumni Award in 2015.

Lockhart is an avid rock climber and backpacker. He channels his passion for the great outdoors into service with the U.S. national parks and other conservation organizations, working to introduce these American treasures to a more diverse population. He currently is chair of Parks California, a statewide nonprofit dedicated to supporting California’s public lands, and he has played an integral role in expanding programs at NatureBridge, another nonprofit that offers educational opportunities in national parks to more than 30,000 children and teens each year. A member of the Arts & Sciences National Council, Lockhart endowed the Josephine Lockhart Memorial Scholarship, which benefits math and science students, in honor of his mother, Josephine, BS ’73, MA ’75. He also made a gift to Arts & Sciences to name the Lockhart and Bals Director’s Office of Environmental Studies in the Craig and Nancy Schnuck Pavilion.

Lockhart lives in Oakland, California, with his wife, Karen, and his daughter, Anna Lockhart.

Merry L. Mosbacher, MBA ’82

Principal (retired), Edward Jones

Merry L. Mosbacher built a 37-year career at Edward Jones, where she supported financial advisers in securing their clients’ futures. She was the fifth woman to become general partner at the company and paid her success forward by being a role model for others and actively participating in the firm’s leadership development of associates and financial advisers from underrepresented groups.

Mosbacher earned her bachelor’s degree in economics from Knox College. She joined Edward Jones as a student intern while pursuing her Master of Business Administration at Olin Business School. In 1982, she became a full-time member of the firm’s investment-banking department. During her 12 years in that role, she was responsible for more than 60 public offerings.

She became a principal in 1986, going on to lead the firm’s insurance and annuity products area. In this position, she worked with insurance companies to develop new products, drive client service innovation, and integrate insurance and annuities into the firm’s systems and reports.

After being active in the company’s diversity and inclusion efforts for several years, she formally joined that area of the firm in 2018, focusing on the professional development of women and others until her retirement in 2019. She currently serves as a trustee of the firm’s Bridge Builder Mutual Funds.

Mosbacher has held leadership positions with a variety of charitable organizations, including the United Way, St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf, the YWCA, and STAGES St. Louis. She was named one of St. Louis’ 25 most influential businesswomen by The St. Louis Business Journal and was designated a St. Louis Woman of Achievement in the area of Community Betterment in 2013.

Merry and her husband, Jim, are actively involved as volunteers and philanthropists at Washington University. The couple has sponsored student scholarships at Olin for 35 years, and Merry served as president of the William Greenleaf Eliot Society from 2017 to 2020. Prior to that role, she chaired the society’s Danforth Circle and Patron membership committees. She also has contributed her time and talents on the selection committee for Olin’s Distinguished Alumni Awards and by assisting with various fundraising campaigns, among other volunteer leadership roles. In 2012, Olin honored her with a Distinguished Alumni Award.

Merry and Jim have two sons and a daughter-in-law who are WashU alumni: James (JT) Mosbacher, AB ’10, MBA ’15; Michael Mosbacher, BS ’12, MBA ’21; and Heidi Morris-Mosbacher, AB ’09.

Ebony G. Patterson, MFA ’06

Artist

Ebony G. Patterson is a prolific mixed-media artist whose multilayered works incorporate painting, sculpture, video, and performance. She employs vibrant colors and lavish floral motifs to seduce viewers into deeper reflections on social and political injustices. Her work, which often places disembodied figures hidden among decorative tapestries, suggests acts of violence and oppression are lurking beneath the ornamental surface.

To create the large-scale tapestries for which she is famous, Patterson conducts photoshoots with locals from her neighborhood in Kingston, Jamaica, giving them specially designed props and costumes and placing them within opulent sets. She then prints the images on heavy paper or hand-woven jacquard, manipulating and embellishing the material until the figures are buried within the jewels, flora, and fauna.

Patterson’s work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at prominent art institutions, including the Pérez Art Museum Miami, Speed Art Museum, Nasher Museum of Art, Baltimore Museum of Art, Studio Museum in Harlem, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Museum of Arts and Design, Kunsthal Aarhus in Denmark, and most recently at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.  She has been included in prestigious global exhibitions, including the Liverpool Biennial 2021, Athens Biennale 2021, Bienal de São Paulo 2016, Havana Biennial 2015, Ghetto Biennale Haiti 2009, and Jamaica Biennial 2007, 2010, 2014.

Her works also are in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, Brooklyn Museum, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; and the National Gallery of Jamaica, among other institutions. A special installation of her work is on view at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University from November 2021 through spring 2022.

Patterson has held teaching positions at the University of Virginia and was a tenured professor at the University of Kentucky, where she taught painting and mixed media. 

In 2018, the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts recognized Patterson with the Stone & DeGuire Contemporary Art Award, which helps promising WashU alumni artists advance their studio practice. She also received a United States Artists award that year, given to the most compelling creatives living and working in America. She has received numerous grants that support the continuation and evolution of her work, and was the recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Art Grant in 2015 and the Young Alumni Award at the 2011 Sam Fox School Distinguished Alumni Awards.

Patterson earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Edna Manley College in 2004 and her Master of Fine Arts in printmaking and drawing from the Sam Fox School in 2006.  Upcoming projects include a group show at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) Watershed in the summer of 2022, an exhibit at the New York Botanical Garden in the summer of 2023, a solo show at the New Orleans Museum of Art in the fall of 2023, and a solo exhibit at the Arnolfini International Centre for Contemporary Art in the United Kingdom in the spring and summer of 2024.

Steven G. Segal, BSBA ’82

Executive-in-Residence/Lecturer, Boston University

A highly experienced investor and financial adviser, Steven G. Segal is an executive-in-residence and lecturer at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business. There, he advises student managed equity funds and designed and teaches graduate level coursework in private equity and leverage buyouts. In addition, he counsels early stage venture capital firms and provides expert courtroom testimony for multimillion dollar litigation.

Segal previously was a co-founding partner and managing director of J.W. Childs Associates, a Boston-based private equity investment firm. His responsibilities included raising capital as well as analyzing, negotiating, and managing buyout transactions. He also was heavily involved in the decision process for the firm’s many investments and helped direct the strategic financial policy of several of its portfolio companies.

Prior to that position, he served as managing director of Thomas H. Lee Co., another private equity investment firm in Boston. A certified public accountant, he began his career in the tax department at Arthur Anderson & Co. in San Francisco. Segal earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from Washington University and his master’s degree in business administration from Harvard Business School.

Segal has a long legacy of service to businesses and nonprofit organizations. He has held positions on the board of directors for more than 20 corporations, including Ghirardelli Chocolate Co., Universal Hospital Services Inc., and Snapple Beverage Corp. He was the inaugural board chair of Courageous Parent Network, a nonprofit that helps families care for children with life-limiting illness, and a board member for Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Greater Boston. An avid cyclist, Segal has participated in the Pan-Mass Challenge bike ride for more than 30 years and has raised more than $2 million for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

An active alumni leader, Segal has served Washington University in numerous volunteer capacities. He is an emeritus member of the Alumni Board of Governors, which he chaired from 2017 to 2018, a role that includes ex-officio service to the Board of Trustees. A current member and past chair of the Boston Regional Cabinet, Segal joined the Olin Business School National Council in 2013. He and his wife, Ellen, BSBA ’82, were co-chairs of the Boston Regional Campaign Committee for Leading Together: The Campaign for Washington University. The business school recognized him with a 2013 Distinguished Alumni Award.

The Segals have given generously to Washington University, supporting scholarships, facilities, and Olin’s Israel Summer Business Academy. The couple also has made gifts to the School of Medicine to advance Alzheimer’s research. They have three children: Ryan Segal, AB ’13, Lindsey Segal, AB ’16, and Samantha Segal, AB ’19.

Sarah K. England, PhD

Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Professor of Medicine
Vice Chair of Research and Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Sarah K. England is a distinguished researcher and teacher who has dedicated her career to studying the biological mechanisms that can lead to preterm birth.

Her work has received funding from top agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American Heart Association (AHA), and the March of Dimes. She also serves on the review committees for several funding organizations, including the NIH, AHA, March of Dimes, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

England’s research laboratory at Washington University has three current focus areas: determining how ion channels in the muscles of the uterus regulate its tendency to contract; investigating the consequences of genetic variants on the oxytocin receptor; and studying how disruptions in circadian rhythms affect pregnancy outcomes. She came to the university in 2011 after spending 14 years as a faculty member at the University of Iowa.

During her tenure at Iowa, England was involved in several educational initiatives, including serving as director of the Iowa Biosciences Advantage program. An NIH-funded Initiative for Maximizing Student Development, the program focuses on increasing the number of historically underrepresented undergraduates pursuing doctoral degrees in the biomedical sciences. She also was a co-investigator of the university’s NIH-funded Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training grant, which allows students to study health disparities in developing countries.

She was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow from 2005 to 2006, working in the office of then-Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton on policies related to women’s health, maternal child health, and the health-care workforce. England earned her bachelor’s degree from Carleton College, and her doctorate in physiology from the Medical College of Wisconsin. She completed postdoctoral training at Vanderbilt University in the Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics.

Pauline T. Kim, JD

Daniel Noyes Kirby Professor of Law

Pauline T. Kim is a renowned expert on the law of employment and the workplace. She has written extensively about issues affecting workers, including employee privacy, discrimination, and job security, as well as about the role of courts and judicial decision-making. She is the co-author of a leading textbook on employment law, titled Work Law: Cases and Materials, now in its fourth edition.

Kim’s research addresses the impact of technological developments on workplace rights. Her latest efforts focus on employers’ use of big data and artificial intelligence, and in particular, how these technologies affect employee privacy and workplace equality.

Kim has been voted the David M. Becker Professor of the Year twice in the last six years by the university’s law students. In addition to her teaching role, she serves as co-director of the Center for Empirical Research in the Law, which both advances empirical legal scholarship and builds technological tools to enhance teaching and research.

She also is a resident fellow at the Cordell Institute for Policy in Medicine & Law, which focuses on ethical issues surrounding big data in health care. In addition, she is a faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity & Equity, which supports interdisciplinary research on the role of race and ethnicity in all aspects of contemporary society. Previously, she was the law school’s associate dean for research and faculty development.

Prior to joining Washington University, Kim served as a staff attorney for the Employment Law Center/Legal Aid Society of San Francisco, now known as Legal Aid at Work. There, she litigated cases on behalf of low-income workers facing discrimination, harassment, and illegal conditions on the job.

She earned her bachelor’s degree from Harvard and Radcliffe Colleges in 1984 and went on to become a Henry Fellow at Oxford University. In 1988, she earned her law degree from Harvard University. Following law school, she served as a judicial clerk for Judge Cecil F. Poole on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. She was elected to the American Law Institute, and has served as an adviser to the Restatement of Employment Law. Kim currently serves on the boards of the Center of Creative Arts and Health Protection & Education Services. She and her husband, Philip Lee, have two children, Jocelyn and Nicholas.

Matthew W. Kreuter, PhD, MPH

Kahn Family Professor of Public Health

Matthew W. Kreuter is a leading public health expert whose research seeks to understand and improve the lives and health of low-income Americans, with the goal of eliminating health disparities along socioeconomic lines.

Kreuter currently serves as the Kahn Family Professor of Public Health at the Brown School as well as founder and senior scientist of the Health Communication Research Laboratory (HCRL), now in its 26th year of continuous federal funding.

As leader of the HCRL, he has developed and evaluated a variety of health communications programs that effectively promote health, modify behavior, and prevent and manage disease. He also authored the first comprehensive book on tailored health communication, called Tailoring Health Messages.

Kreuter’s work with HCRL has proved critical during the COVID-19 pandemic. The laboratory currently leads three major community partnerships in St. Louis as part of national networks established by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to address racial disparities in testing and vaccination.

His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and many national health foundations. He has been ranked in three separate bibliometric studies in the top 1% of researchers in his field based on journal article citations. Kreuter earned both his master’s degree in public health and his doctorate in health behavior and health education from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Christopher “Kit” Heath Wellman, PhD

Professor of Philosophy

Professor Christopher “Kit” Heath Wellman is an award-winning scholar and teacher in the Department of Philosophy in Arts & Sciences. A prolific researcher and writer who has authored and co-authored six books and numerous articles, he specializes in ethical issues related to political and legal philosophy. He is best known for his distinctive views on topics such as political legitimacy, the duty to obey the law, secession, and immigration.

His research focuses on a variety of real-world matters, from the morality of immigration restrictions to the obligations of the pharmaceutical industry during a global emergency. As a result, U.S. government groups such as the  Department of State, the  Department of Justice, and the Institute of Peace have sought his counsel over the years.

Currently, Wellman serves as a member of an international interdisciplinary research group that provides guidance to political leaders, the World Health Organization, pharmaceutical executives, and others on pressing issues related to COVID-19. In this role, he offers input on ethical concerns, such as the equitable distribution of vaccines.

He earned bachelor’s degrees in philosophy and economics at the University of North Carolina and went on to complete his doctorate in philosophy at the University of Arizona.

Prior to joining the faculty at Washington University, he taught at Guilford College and Georgia State University. There, he directed the Jean Beer Blumenfeld Center for Ethics, which supports students as they engage with broad ethical questions facing both individuals and humanity at large.

Wellman has held several administrative roles during his time at the university. He was chair of the Department of Philosophy from 2010 until 2016, chair of the Department of Education from 2016 until 2019, and was dean of academic planning from 2015 until 2021. From 2013 to 2017, he was a faculty fellow on the South 40, where he lived with his wife, Donna, and their two sons, Alexander and Jackson.

Wellman is known for his outstanding dedication to students and to the teaching profession. In 2009, WashU undergraduates selected him to deliver the “Last Lecture,” an annual talk marking the end of the academic year. Wellman believes this is perhaps the greatest honor he has received.